We Live and Learn 

Good morning all.

Our lads are back from Abeokuta, docked safely in Port Harcourt as it happens. Of course, when you set out toward a certain destination, you are doing so expecting to arrive. It is not really news when you do. Then again, you look at the unfortunate incident that befell our brothers Heartland, and you’re reminded how even the most routine things in life can go wrong. Here’s wishing their wounded a speedy recovery.

Rather unbecomingly, our lads returned from their trip bearing no gifts. Which is a shame. It’s spilt milk, so little point to griping over that result. Unlike the loss to Niger Tornadoes in Lokoja, there was no hint of controversy: Ikorodu United were simply better, and fully deserving. Over the course of this season, you could say this about a number of teams in the league as well, in relation to Enyimba.

While the desire to look ahead is admirable, there is a saying that when an elderly man stubs his foot, he turns around to regard the offending stone. A young man simply trudges on, learning nothing and oblivious to possible pitfalls. So, by all means look to the future, but remember that, even though you cannot change the past, you certainly can learn from it.

For instance, if you had been in charge of the club at the start of the year, what would you have done differently, especially with the benefit of hindsight? There is a palpable sense of frustration about being unable to play on home turf, but let us not forget the state of the Enyimba International Stadium surface last season.

The calls were vocal and frenzied at the time: such a playing green (well, brown mostly) was not befitting of a club of Enyimba’s status. Some even went so far as to call for the club to be relocated, and incidentally we had quite a few live games, so the state of affairs was visible to the world.

Bearing all of this in mind, would it have been worth it to soldier on in spite of the situation? Surely, if faced with an unpleasant task, it is wise to get it out of the way quickly. The club elected to bite the bullet, and even though it backfired, it was the right choice in my opinion.

Also, how much damage did the dalliance over Kadiri Ikhana do? I am well aware some are oft he opinion he should have never left – when you win the CAF Champions League, you are certainly going to have fans eating out of your hand – but i am more concerned by the fact that negotiations with the club seemed to drag, culminating in the ultimately late appointment of the present boss. With certain decisions, decisiveness is almost as important as choice; it’s no use picking the right option at the wrong time.

So, by looking back, it is easy to see how much of an impact the club’s two major decisions in the off-season has come to define this one. 

No, we’re done crying over the spilt milk, we can smash the jug and move right along.
Or, we could just go ahead and indulge my zany theory that it is, in fact, the fault of our kit. I mean, what is that thick block of white by the sides? You wonder whether the club management had any input, or were given a range of choices to pick from.

Ok, I’m sorry Umbro. I’m not really mad at you guys. Just transferring aggression. We’re cool? We’re cool. Hugs?

We’ll do this again tomorrow.

‘EnyimbaEnyi

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2 thoughts on “We Live and Learn 

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  1. Surely we need to return to our original homeground in Aba. Playing in Ph is like playing away. By the end of this season we need to do a thorough evaluation of both the players and the coaching staff and see who stays and goes. Enyimba must be returned to its glorious state. Nice one boss

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